Evaluation of toxic components in underground drinking water and its effects on the health of the rural people of Hyderabad, Pakistan

  • Najeeb Khatian Faculty of Pharmacy, Ziauddin University Clifton Karachi 75600, Pakistan.
  • Qurratul ain Leghari Faculty of Pharmacy, Ziauddin University Clifton Karachi 75600, Pakistan.
  • Hammad Ahmed Faculty of Pharmacy, Ziauddin University Clifton Karachi 75600 https://orcid.org/0000-0002-7339-0690
Keywords: Underground water, weight loss, physical changes, appetite loss, alopecia, arsenic, lead

Abstract

Background: In rural areas, the people use underground water as it is the main and easy source of water. For this purpose they use hand pumps, bores, tube well and well water. Upon testing of hardness some sources give positive results that conforms the hardness of water. Objective: The objective of the study was to ensure the safety use of underground drinking water and to evaluate the toxic components in various samples of underground drinking water by using different colorimetric and spectrophotometric techniques. Methodology: This study was based on survey and experimental method. In this study, 5 liters of water was collected in clean plastic bottle from 3 different villages of Taluka Tandojam district Hyderabad. The evaluation of the toxic components in various samples of underground drinking water was carried out by using different colorimetric and spectrophotometric techniques. A self-structured questionnaire was adapted for the assessment of health related issue and to find out the relationship between the type of drinking water and the morbidity. Results: It was found that subjects who drank underground water on the regular bases were suffering from gyaenacological problem, alopecia and gastrointestinal problems with highest percentage as 56.25 %, 55.71% and 52.85% respectively. Dermal and dental related problems were 28.57% and 27.14% respectively. Problem observed in urinary system was 12.85%. Conclusion: Higher values of toxic components such as lead, arsenic etc significantly decreases the quality of drinking water. Therefore, the awareness programs on chemical contents in drinking water and their hazardous effects on human body should be organized at national level to improve the public health problems caused due to contaminated drinking water.

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Author Biography

Hammad Ahmed, Faculty of Pharmacy, Ziauddin University Clifton Karachi 75600

Assistant Professor

Department of Pharmacology,

Faculty of Pharmacy,

Ziauddin University,

Clifton, Karachi.

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Published
2019-03-24
How to Cite
Khatian, N., Leghari, Q. ain, & Ahmed, H. (2019). Evaluation of toxic components in underground drinking water and its effects on the health of the rural people of Hyderabad, Pakistan. International Journal of Biomedical and Advance Research, 10(3), e5049. https://doi.org/10.7439/ijbar.v10i3.5049
Section
Original Research Articles